[su_box title=”Domestic violence against men”] [su_accordion] [su_spoiler title=”Authors”] Dr Ben Hine, University of West London [/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Video”][/su_spoiler] [/su_accordion] [/su_box] [su_box title=”Investigating men’s perception of mental health support and awareness campaigns”] [su_accordion] [su_spoiler title=”Background”]

Around 75% of cases classified as suicide nationwide are committed by men aged between 25 and 60 (ONS, 2015). Yet, men are less likely than women to actively seek help, largely due to the still-widespread masculinity stereotypes (e.g. seeking help is unmanly). As such, strategies to encourage men to seek help related to mental health issues, coping problems, and suicidal thoughts must derive from men-specific attitudes, concerns and context, rather than from unisex or female-specific assumptions. In the present study, we explore men’s perception of support and awareness poster campaigns, with a particular focus on identifying the factors contributing to a successful message.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Methods”]

114 men, aged between 20 and 75, took part in an online questionnaire study compiled with Qualtrics. All participants answered the same set of questions about four posters targeted at men with mental health issues.  Two of them were genuine campaign posters depicting an individual figure, while the remaining two were created for the purpose of the study, and highlight group belonging and support.  Three dimensions were explored: factors behind a convincing poster, the most encouraging poster taglines, and general responsiveness to conversation- versus action-based encouragement.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Results”]

The results suggest that a convincing message relies on a combination of characteristics, including relatability, connection to anxiety, belief in change, and an outcome-focused call-to-action in form of a simple command. Notably, a sub-group of men was found to be more responsive to group posters, an effect possibly linked to younger age. Finally, conversation and a goal-oriented, problem-solving approach were not mutually exclusive (with a slight preference for the latter), suggesting that men are likely to be the most receptive to conversation when it is framed as a step to a goal.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Authors”]

Lina Skora (presenter)

Oliver Payne

The Hunting Dynasty

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Video”][/su_spoiler] [/su_accordion] [/su_box] [su_box title=”How much is suicidality related to competitiveness, locus of control, and interest in family values?”] [su_accordion] [su_spoiler title=”Background”]

Seager has proposed a ‘Gender Script’ theory of suicidality, hypothesising that traditional male views predict suicidality. In support of this hypothesis, Seager, Sullivan & Barry (2014) found that higher scores two male gender subscales predicted increased risk of suicidality (Fight & Win, P<.001; Mastery & Control, P<.042), and higher scores on one female gender subscale predicted reduced risk of suicidality (Family Harmony, P<.003). The purpose of the present study is to test the concurrent validity of the Gender Script subscales by measuring their correlation with other validated questionnaires which tap potentially equivalent constructs (hypercompetitiveness, locus of control, and family values).

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Methods”]

This study is a cross-sectional internet survey analysed using Pearson’s correlations (and multiple linear regression. The study started in Feb 2016.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Results”]

At the time of writing, 34 men and 90 women have participated. Preliminary analysis using Pearson’s correlations has found that for men there is moderate concurrent validity for two of the Gender Script subscales (Fight & Win and Family Harmony), but not Mastery & Control. Reasons for the latter finding are discussed. All scales apart from hypercompetitiveness are significant predictors of suicidality.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Conclusions”]

These findings are preliminary but it is hoped that the final findings will have implications for understanding and predicting suicidality in men and women, and be valuable in the clinical context.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Authors”]

Laura Middleton Curran (presenter),1 Seager M,2 Brown B,3 Barry JA4

1 Open University, Milton Keynes, UK
2 Central London Samaritans, London, UK
3 University College University, London
4 UCL Medical School, London NW3 2PF

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Video”][/su_spoiler] [/su_accordion] [/su_box] [su_box title=”An interpretative phenomenological analysis investigation Into men’s experience of psychological change Without psychotherapy”] [su_accordion] [su_spoiler title=”Background”]

Men have been under-represented in the small body of research into naturally-occurring psychological change. Therefore, this study aimed to replicate and expand previous research in this area by elucidating how men’s naturally-occurring psychological change occurs and to discover whether particular features of the change experience reported in previous studies emerged.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Methods”]

The qualitative method of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was employed to provide in-depth accounts of the psychological change experience from the perspective of those who experienced the change. A snowball sampling method was used to recruit volunteers. Ten men took part in the investigation that had experienced psychological change without therapy. The interview schedule utilised in earlier studies was employed.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Results”]

Interviews were transcribed and analysed using IPA. From the analysis, five main themes emerged: coping with the problem, turning points, addressing the problem, appraising the experience positively and time.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Conclusions”]

Experiencing an insight, or perspective shift, prior to becoming motivated seems to be particularly important in the change process. Thinking and action-orientated problem-solving appears to be central to the change process too. Incorporating the findings from naturally-occurring change research into psychotherapy will enhance it (Lampropoulos & Spengler (2005). It is also important to assimilate men’s experiences into the therapy process (Mahalik, Good, & Englar-Carlson, 2003). Wider dissemination of these findings could improve preventative measures for men who do not attend therapy too. Further research into naturally-occurring psychological change is required to extend these findings and improve their generalisability.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Authors”]

Catherine Buchan (Presenter), Victoria Galbraith1 and Timothy A. Carey2,3

1 School of Applied Sciences, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton

2 Centre for Remote Health, a joint Centre of Flinders University and Charles Darwin University, Australia

3 Central Australian Mental Health Service, NT Department of Health and Families, Australia

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Video”][/su_spoiler] [/su_accordion] [/su_box] [su_box title=”A systematic review on the factors associated with positive experiences in carers of someone with cancer: the male perspective”] [su_accordion] [su_spoiler title=”Background”]

Individuals can experience well-being under difficult circumstances but little is known about how this may apply to those who care for someone with cancer. Research demonstrates that gender plays an important role in carer coping strategies and outcomes. However, less is known about male cancer carers. The increasing number of male carers highlights the need for greater understanding on the different experiences between male and female carers.  A systematic review was carried out to identify the factors associated with positive experiences in carers of someone with a cancer diagnosis.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Methods”]

A systematic search of the following electronic databases was undertaken: Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SocINDEX and Medline. Literature was searched using terms relating to cancer, caring and positive experiences.  Two reviewers were involved in data extraction, quality appraisal, coding, synthesis, and analysis. Attributes were identified through a process of searching for summary codes. The codes were then grouped into broader themes. Using a concept analysis framework the themes were then categorised as ‘attributes’ of positive caring.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Results”]

54 papers were included in the overall analysis. 16 papers specifically focused on gender. Analysis identified three overarching attributes associated with a positive caring experience: ‘personal resources’, ‘finding meaning’ and ‘social context.’ The male and female experience was contrasted to explore how these attributes provide insight into how male carers may negotiate their gendered subjectivity.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Conclusions”]

Despite the challenges associated with caring this combination of internal and external factors enabled some carers to experience positive elements of caring. However, males and females appear to approach the role differently. The findings of this review will inform a deeper qualitative investigation into the male carer experience.

 

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Authors”]

 

Jenny Young, Research Assistant/ PhD student, Edinburgh Napier University [/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Video”][/su_spoiler] [/su_accordion] [/su_box] [su_box title=”Boys perform better in visuospatial cognitive task from infancy to puberty: meta-analysis & meta-regression”] [su_accordion] [su_spoiler title=”Background”]

In adults, sex differences in 2D (two dimensional) and 3D (three dimensional) mental rotation tasks are well-established. This paper describes the first meta-analysis to (i) thoroughly assess the sex difference in ability in children of all ages (3 months to 13 years old), and (ii) assess this difference for 2D and 3D tasks separately.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Methods”]

From an initial pool of 137 papers, 20 studies (2800 boys and 2625 girls, aged between three months and 12 years old) met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis was used to examine the overall difference in strength for mental rotation tasks. Meta-regression was used to assess the effect of age and whether the task had a time limit or not on the magnitude of sex differences in mental rotation performance.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Results”]

Overall, boys performed significantly better both on 3D mental rotation tasks and 2D mental rotation tasks. Meta-regression showed no significant effect of age or whether the task had a time limit.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Conclusions”]

We found that sex differences for both 2D and 3D mental rotation ability emerge at a young age and stay constant until puberty. Because the sex difference appears in infancy before much socialisation can have occurred, and remains steady throughout childhood despite any effect of the schooling environment, these findings support a biological explanation for sex differences in mental rotation. Implications for theory of gender development and for education are discussed.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Authors”]

Fischer, R.A., (presenter), Glasgow Caledonian University, U.K.

Barry, J.A., Medical School, University College London, U.K.

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Video”][/su_spoiler] [/su_accordion] [/su_box] [su_box title=”The Boy Crisis”]

In this keynote lecture Warren Farrell talks about why the Boy Crisis is worldwide and why it calls for an evolutionary shift in Male Psychology.

[su_accordion] [su_spoiler title=”About”]

If there is any topic in male psychology that might be more important than male suicide, it’s the crisis that seems to be afflicting boys in our culture. There appear to be a variety of causes, including absence of fathers, an education system that has forgotten them, narrow lifestyle choices, and addiction to information technology. In his keynote, Farrell outlines the problems and offers possible solutions. [/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Video”][/su_spoiler] [/su_accordion] [/su_box] [su_box title=”The Provider Role”]

In this fascinating talk Belinda Brown explores the effect that an absent father figure can have on boys and girls while they grow up.

[su_accordion] [su_spoiler title=”Background”] The educational performance of boys has been worse than for girls for a number of years. While a number of researchers have examined the pathways through which single parent families impact differently on boys and girls, these don’t account for all of the differences in educational outcomes. This study aimed to explore associations between school childrens’ attitudes towards the family roles and educational performance, and the role of fathers in families.[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Methods”] A questionnaire survey was used to explore attitudes towards family life and attitudes towards school. The survey was administered to 130 girls and 271 boys from three South London secondary schools. [/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Results”] Levels of interest in school were cross tabulated with attitudes towards family life. There appeared to be a relationship between having a more traditional attitude towards family life and having a greater interest in school, and this relationship appeared to be slightly stronger for boys than for girls. [/su_spoiler][su_spoiler title=”Conclusions”] There does appear to be some kind of relationship between attitudes towards family life and interest in school however this relationship and the pathways through which it occurs need exploring further. [/su_spoiler][su_spoiler title=”Authors”]

Belinda Brown,1 Dench G,2 Barry JA3
1 University College University, London
2 University of Middlesex, London
3 UCL Medical School, London NW3 2PF
Presenter: Belinda Brown

[/su_spoiler] [su_spoiler title=”Video”][/su_spoiler] [/su_accordion] [/su_box]
Scroll to top